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Understanding vaccines: Which? When? Why?

Vaccination is a simple, critical way to protect animals from common, deadly diseases.

Our Wellness Plans address basic information regarding vaccines for cats and dogs.

On this page, you'll find the latest information about vaccine-preventable diseases. Please email us, or call 920-648-2421, if you have questions about vaccination.
 


8 April 2015 - Canine Influenza Virus

Wondering about Canine Influenza Virus (CIV)?

Aaron Rodgers famously quieted Packers Nation with one word....Relax.

Dr. Stork and Dr. Clark will try and do the same for dog lovers.

Canine Influenza virus is a real consideration. It is not to be feared, and a great opportunity for some common sense and precaution. Simply put, all the same risk factors for garden variety Kennel Cough, apply to CIV.

Dogs who are most at risk spend time in concentrated animal facilities, or are in contact with animals who do. That would be shelters, kennels and daycares. Outdoor spaces and dog parks are less of a risk.

The enormous majority of dogs infected with CIV present with mild signs and recover in time with supportive care and sometimes antibiotics. It will look to the owner and veterinarian like a more severe case of kennel cough. The cough will be "wetter", the dog will feel poor and often run a fever.

There is a very effective vaccine. It is recommended for those whose dogs are kenneled, boarded or might be in contact with dogs "from the BIG CITY". We carry this vaccine; it requires an initial shot and then a booster. Please call us at 920-648-2421 if you'd like to discuss whether your dog should receive the vaccine. Merck, the manufacturer of the vaccine, also has more information here: www.doginfluenza.com.

The virus is pretty fragile in the environment and is easily killed with most soaps and disinfectants. It only lasts about 48 hours.

If you have questions or concerns we recommend calling us at 920-648-2421, or referencing the CDC website at www.cdc.gov.


11 October 2012 - Rabies: still a threat

Rabies_pdf_image.jpgThere are roughly 7,000 cases of rabies reported in the United States each year. Most are in wild animals, but cases are reported regularly in pet cats and dogs. Vaccination is your first and best line of defense against this fatal disease. See the file below for more information.